Semantics of tonality ... (part II)
Since we are talking about an authentic instrument system in the performance of music of the 18th – early 19th centuries, I will share some observations. One of the pioneers…

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Benjamin Britten and his temporal variations for oboe
Benjamin Britten is one of the most prominent composers of the twentieth century, not only in the UK, but throughout the world. His work covers a large number of genres,…

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A little bit about the musical education of children
Dear, dear colleagues! I dare to publish this small article only because at every point I can refer to authorities. And yet - I think that it can help beginner…

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January 6 – the birthday of the hymn “God Save the Tsar”

January 6, 1834 the anthem “God Save the Tsar!” Was adopted as the anthem of the Russian Empire. It was first publicly performed the day before, on December 18, 1833, and replaced the previous hymn, “The Prayer of the Russian People”

“God save the Tsar!
Strong, sovereign,
Reign in glory to us;
Reign in fear to enemiesOrthodox Tsar!
God save the Tsar! ”

January 6, 1834 the anthem “God Save the Tsar!” Was adopted as the anthem of the Russian Empire. It was first publicly performed the day before, on December 18, 1833, and replaced the previous hymn, “The Prayer of the Russian People.”
The original version of the national anthem of the Russian Empire was written in 1815 by Vasily Zhukovsky to the music of the English hymn “God save the King” (“God Save the King”) and approved by Alexander I in 1816.
In 1833, Prince Alexei Lvov accompanied Nicholas I during a visit to Austria and Prussia, where the emperor was greeted with an English march. Upon his return, the king instructed Lvov, as the musician closest to him, to compose a new anthem.
Zhukovsky rewrote the words of the new anthem, but with the participation of Alexander Pushkin. Lvov as a reward in 1834 was enlisted as an adjutant wing (with the rank of captain) in the corps of cavalry guards for the performance of the court service.
It was an official anthem until the February Revolution of 1917. After a forty-year hiatus, Soviet Russia heard him only in 1958 in the movie “Quiet Flows the Don.” In 1903, Umberto Giorgiano included the music of the anthem in the opera Siberia.
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky used the tune “God Save the Tsar!” In composition No. 31 Slavic March, at the end of the Solemn Overture of 1812, as well as in the Solemn March on the occasion of the coronation of Alexander III.
The author of the anthem, the composer Lvov, forty years later received an honorary place in the allegorical picture of Ilya Repin “Slavic composers” between Glinka, Dargomyzhsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Chopin, Oginsky and others.
In the novel-requiem of Mikhail Bulgakov “The White Guard”, which describes the events of the civil war in Ukraine at the end of 1918, Nikolka begins to sing the anthem, followed by Shervinsky, Myshlaevsky and Turbin Sr.
The creation of the anthem in 1833-1834 is not accidental. It was a time of formation, geographical expansion and political strengthening of the Russian Empire. On the eve of Uvarov for the first time he announced the formula “Orthodoxy, autocracy, nationality.”

THE PHILOSOPHICAL-AESTHETIC ASPECTS OF THE CATEGORY OF CREATIVITY IN MUSIC AND PERFORMING ARTS
The theory of musical performance, and in particular of its individual branches, has not yet been fully established. This conclusion exists in musicology and still, despite the high level of…

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Semantics of keys ...
The process of establishing a certain emotional content for each key continued in the music of Viennese classics and covered almost their entire list in the music of romantics, both…

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STAKHEVICH A. G. SPIRITUAL MUSIC P. G. CHESNOKOV
The life and work of the outstanding Russian composer Pavel Grigoryevich Chesnokov (1877-1944) was devoted to the choral art of the Orthodox Church. Chesnokov’s spiritual musical heritage has been little…

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The use of E. JACQUES DALCROSE system in teaching
“Prophet of rhythm”, “musical Pestalozzi” ... These epithets are addressed to the Swiss teacher, composer Emil Jacques - Dalkroz, undeservedly, in my opinion, forgotten by our contemporaries. I want to…

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